A Closer Look at a Robotic Barn with Access to Grazing

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Grazing cows

In this month’s edition of The Navigator we are sharing a (6) VMS milk-first, bedded pack layout with grazing access. This design is quite simple in that everything is covered under one square roof yet offers automation that is easy to learn for the cows and manage for the producer.

Grazing dairy robot setup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the milking area, the robots are arranged in a toll-gate style when cows enter from one side called the Commitment Pen and exit on the other side.  The advantage over a tandem arrangement, where robots are nose-to-tail, is realized most when there are multiple robots milking one group of cows.  First, the cows exiting away from the Commitment Pen eliminates co-mingling.  The issue here is cows waiting to be milked are mixed with just milked cows leading to a congestion.  Second, sorting cows is facilitated.  In a tandem layout with multiple robots we either have to co-mingle cows in the Commitment Pen then sort using an exit Smart Selection Gate, or sort through adjacent robots.  This is typically acceptable in a free flow layout where maximizing capacity (time milking) is not necessarily desired.  In milk first we are allowing only cows with milk permission into the robots, thereby maximizing capacity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another benefit of this design is AB grazing.  That means cows from either group can freely exit the barn to a common paddock that is open and are sorted back into their respective groups when reentering the barn through the Smart Selection Gate.  Upon reentering the barn the cows go directly to the entry Smart Selection Gate via a grooved concrete lane.  There are two benefits to this: 1) cows with milk permission will go directly to the robots, otherwise they are redirected to feed and 2) the quality of the bedded pack is preserved when cows reentering the barn do not go directly into the pack at one point.

Full layout of robotic barn for grazing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Although this design was prepared for a specific dairy that is retrofitting an open air barn that is covered by a shade, it can be adapted to a greenfield build as well.

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Jeff is Project Design Manager - Robotics and has been designing robotic barns for DeLaval for the past 4 ½ years. To date, he has planned and designed more than 200 robotic milking and calf barns. While growing up in Northern NY, Jeff was proudly employed by his father's construction company building freestall and calf facilities in addition to conventional parlors. He also worked on several dairies during that time. Currently Jeff resides in Arvada, Colorado in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains and spends his free time backcountry snowmobiling and skiing with family and friends.

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